? Energy and protein requirements for maintenance of Hu sheep during pregnancy
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    2018, Vol. 17 Issue (01): 173-183     DOI: 10.1016/S2095-3119(17)61691-5
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Energy and protein requirements for maintenance of Hu sheep during pregnancy
ZHANG Hao1, 2, 3, SUN Ling-wei1, WANG Zi-yu1, MA Tie-wei1, DENG Ming-tian1, WANG Feng1, ZHANG Yan-li1
1 Jiangsu Engineering Technology Research Center of Mutton Sheep & Goat Industry, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, P.R.China
2 Laboratory of Metabolic Manipulation of Herbivorous Animal Nutrition, College of Animal Science and Technology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009, P.R.China
3 Joint International Research Laboratory of Agriculture & Agri-product Safety, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009, P.R.China
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Abstract This study aimed to determine the effect of stage and level of feed intake on energy metabolism, carbon-nitrogen (C-N) balance, and methane emission to determine energy and protein requirements for maintenance of maternal body including pregnancy tissues during pregnancy using the method of C-N balance.  Twenty-one ewes carrying twin fetuses were randomly divided into three groups of seven ewes each in the digestion and respirometry trial at d 40, 100, and 130 of gestation, respectively.  Three groups were fed a mixed diet either for ad libitum intake, 70 or 50% of the ad libitum intake during pregnancy.  The results showed that the apparent digestibility of C and N were increased as feeding levels decreased at each stage of gestation.  The daily net energy requirements for maintenance (NEm) were 295.80, 310.09, and 323.59 kJ kg–1 BW0.75 (metabolic body weight) with a partial efficiency of metabolisable energy utilization for maintenance of 0.664, 0.644, and 0.620 at d 40, 100, and 130 of gestation, respectively.  The daily net protein requirements for maintenance were 1.99, 2.35, and 2.99 g kg–1 BW0.75 at d 40, 100, and 130 of gestation, respectively.  These results for the nutritional requirements of the net energy and protein may help to formulate more balanced diets for Hu sheep during pregnancy.
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Key wordscarbon and nitrogen balance     energy     methane emission     protein     pregnancy     
Received: 2017-02-08; Published: 2017-06-05
Fund:

The project was supported by the earmarked fund for China Agriculture Research System (CARS-39) and the Agro-scientific Research in the Public Interest, China (201303143).

Corresponding Authors: Correspondence ZHANG Yan-li, Tel/Fax: +86-25-84395381, E-mail: zhangyanli@njau.edu.cn   
About author: ZHANG Hao,E-mail:zhanghao_850220@126.com
Cite this article:   
ZHANG Hao, SUN Ling-wei, WANG Zi-yu, MA Tie-wei, DENG Ming-tian, WANG Feng, ZHANG Yan-li. Energy and protein requirements for maintenance of Hu sheep during pregnancy[J]. Journal of Integrative Agriculture, 2018, 17(01): 173-183.
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http://www.chinaagrisci.com/Jwk_zgnykxen/EN/ 10.1016/S2095-3119(17)61691-5      or     http://www.chinaagrisci.com/Jwk_zgnykxen/EN/Y2018/V17/I01/173
 
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