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Journal of Integrative Agriculture  2013, Vol. 12 Issue (8): 1481-1488    DOI: 10.1016/S2095-3119(13)60376-7
Animal Science · Veterinary Science Advanced Online Publication | Current Issue | Archive | Adv Search |
A Three-Dimensional (3D) Environment to Maintain the Integrity of Mouse Testicular Can Cause the Occurrence of Meiosis
 CHU Zhi-li, LIU Chao, BAI Yao-fu, ZHU Hai-jing, HU Yue , HUA Jin-lian
College of Veterinary Medicine, Shaanxi Center of Stem Cells Engineering & Technology/Key Lab for Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture/Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, P.R.China
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摘要  Adhesions between different cells and extracellular matrix have been studied extensively in vitro, but little is known about their functions in testicular tissue counterparts. Spermatogonia and their companion somatic cells maintain a close association throughout spermatogenesis and this association is necessary for normal spermatogenesis. In order to keep the relative integrity of the testicular tissues, and to detect the development in vitro, culture testicular tissues in a threedimensional (3D) agarose matrix was examined. Testicular tissues isolated from 6.5 d postpartum (dpp) mouse were cultured on the top of the matrix for 26 d with a medium height up to 4/5 of the 3D agarose matrix. The results showed that in this 3D culture environment, each type of testicular cells kept the same structure, localization and function as in vivo and might be more biologically relevant to living organisms. After culture, germ cell marker VASA and meiosis markers DAZL and SCP3 showed typical positive analysed by immunofluorescence staining and RT-PCR. It demonstrated that this 3D culture system was able to maintain the number of germ cells and promote the meiosis initiation of male germ cells.

Abstract  Adhesions between different cells and extracellular matrix have been studied extensively in vitro, but little is known about their functions in testicular tissue counterparts. Spermatogonia and their companion somatic cells maintain a close association throughout spermatogenesis and this association is necessary for normal spermatogenesis. In order to keep the relative integrity of the testicular tissues, and to detect the development in vitro, culture testicular tissues in a threedimensional (3D) agarose matrix was examined. Testicular tissues isolated from 6.5 d postpartum (dpp) mouse were cultured on the top of the matrix for 26 d with a medium height up to 4/5 of the 3D agarose matrix. The results showed that in this 3D culture environment, each type of testicular cells kept the same structure, localization and function as in vivo and might be more biologically relevant to living organisms. After culture, germ cell marker VASA and meiosis markers DAZL and SCP3 showed typical positive analysed by immunofluorescence staining and RT-PCR. It demonstrated that this 3D culture system was able to maintain the number of germ cells and promote the meiosis initiation of male germ cells.
Keywords:  three-dimensional culture (3D)       meiosis       organ culture       mouse  
Received: 28 June 2012   Accepted: 12 September 2013
Fund: 

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31272518), the program for the New Century Excellent Talents of Ministry of Education of China (NCET-09-0654), the Doctoral Fund of Ministry of Education of P.R.China (RFDP, 20120204110030), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (QN2011012).

Corresponding Authors:  Correspondence HUA Jin-lian, Tel: +86-29-87080068, Fax: +86-29-87080068, E-mail: jlhua2003@126.com     E-mail:  jlhua2003@126.com

Cite this article: 

CHU Zhi-li, LIU Chao, BAI Yao-fu, ZHU Hai-jing, HU Yue , HUA Jin-lian. 2013. A Three-Dimensional (3D) Environment to Maintain the Integrity of Mouse Testicular Can Cause the Occurrence of Meiosis. Journal of Integrative Agriculture, 12(8): 1481-1488.

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